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Iball, Llywellyn

Llewellyn Iball was the son of John and Margaret Iball of 104 Daisy Hill. Llewellyn had a sister Margaret and brother Albert living at home in 1901. From the 1901 census we know that John and Margaret had 9 children four of whom had died before 1911. From a family tree on Ancestry five of the children were Albert 1884, Sarah 1886, Margaret 1888, Mary 1890 and Llewellyn 1891. From his service record we know the sisters were Mary Lamb, Margaret Jenkins, and Sarah Grady. Margaret had died in 1907.

Father John Iball was a collier. Llewellyn was a labourer at a brickyard in 1911.

Llewellyn married Mary Elizabeth Davies of Chapel Alley Buckley (father Samuel Davies, collier) at Bistre Emmanuel, January 20, 1912. They had two children: Lillian b 1912, Maggie b 1914. Mary Elizabeth Iball married Frederick Powell, Hawarden Civil Marriage 1918.

County Herald, September 7, 1917
The good news has been received by Mr. & Mrs. John Iball of Brunswick Road, that their son Llewellyn Iball, who has been on active service for a year and nine months has been promoted on the battlefield to the rank of sergeant.
County Herald, October 26, 1917
Sergeant’s Death at the Front – Mrs. Iball, of Buckley, has received the sad news that her husband, Sergeant Llewellyn Iball has been killed at the Front, by a piece of shell. The officer commanding the company writes stating that “Our lads carried him to a cemetery in the rear of the line, where he was buried by the battalion padre. You will no doubt, be informed of the exact position of his grave by the Registration of Graves Committee, who will also send you a photograph later, if you write to the officer in charge. Our battalion pioneers have made a nice white wooden cross with name, date, regiment, etc. on it and it will be placed at the head of your husband’s grave, which you may rest assured will be well cared for.” Sergeant Iball was 26 years of age, and leaves a widow and two children. He was a fine young man and well thought of in the neighbourhood. He had 22 months of active service and had been home on leave once only. He went through many battles. Previous to enlisting he was employed with Messrs. Davison & Co., Ltd., Buckley.

Llywellyn Iball is remembered each year in Buckley with a cross placed on the Hawkesbury Memorial by Corrine Elizabeth Reynolds.

Photo of Llewellyn provided by Corrine Elizabeth Reynolds. This appears to be the dress uniform of one of the pre-war Territorial battalions of the RWF is as follows. Evidence for this is the pointed braid on cuffs used by the RWF, his collar badge is a flaming grenade in the style in use after 1900, and his cap badge is the shape of that for the RWF. His brass shoulder titles have a clear “T” at the top = ‘Territorial Force’ and the other devices are the layout for the RWF (interpretation and military background by Graham Caldwell).

The back of photo has his name and RWF number (23739). The reference to “Dunkirk War” may be  a general reference to the war in Belgium, or France & Flanders. When Llewellyn was killed on 19-9-17, the 16th Bn RWF (part of the 38th Welsh Division) was in the front line at Langemark, just at the tail end of the Ypres battles. Langemark to Dunkirk is 33 miles. The war diary page for that day explains that they were on the defensive in their trenches, but sustained heavy enemy TM barrages all day (TM = Trench Mortars) and this was how Llewellyn was killed along with many others that day.

The photo was taken in Abergavenny which was a training centre for 38th Welsh Division.

 

 

From Tony Iball
From attestation papers we discover that Llewellyn Iball enlisted into the 16 Bn Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 21 April 1915 at Buckley. He was a 24-year-old labourer of 3 Ship Yard, Buckley and was married. He had already served for some time unspecified in the 5 Bn Royal Welsh Fusiliers.
From the medical examination held on the same day we know that Llewellyn was 5 feet 8inches tall, with good physical development. His chest when fully expanded measured 35 inches and the range of expansion was 4 inches. He had three vaccination marks on his left arm from infancy and also showed signs of an old fracture of the left humerus, which was then fully united. His vision in both eyes was 6/6.
Llewellyn’s wife was Mary Elizabeth Iball, formerly Davies. They had married on 20 January 1912 at Emmanuel Church, Bistre and had 2 daughters: Lilian, born on 1 March 1912 at Buckley and Maggie born on 24 March 1914, also at Buckley. (There is some confusion about Maggie’s birth date as the entry ’24 March 1914’ is crossed out on the form and 13 February 1914 inserted in its place).
Llewellyn’s career in the army is briefly summarised at the bottom of a form under the heading ‘Statement of Services’

21/4/1915  Private in 16 Bn RWF granted pay ClassII
21/4/15-1/12/1915  at Home Base
22/11/1916   appointed Lance Corporal
2/12/1915-19/9/1917  in France
18/2/1917   appointed Corporal. Confirmed the same day
10/8/1917   appointed Lance Serjeant. Unpaid
19/9/1917   killed in action

Llewelyn is remembered on the following gravestone in Bistre Churchyard

In Loving Memory of
MARGARET
The beloved daughter of
John & Margaret Iball
Of Buckley
Who died February 24th 1907
Aged 19 years
In the midst of life we are in death
Also Llewelyn, brother of the above
Killed in action (France) Sept. 19th 1917
Aged 26 years
Also the above JOHN IBALL

Who died Dec 8th 1930
Aged 74 years
“At Rest!”
Also the above
Margaret Iball
Died Jan 14th 1936 Aged 75 years

 

The name Iball appears six times on the Hawkesbury Memorial (Albert, Charles, George, Llewellyn, I. J., and Thomas), plus James is on the Bistre Memorial. Charles, George, and James were brothers, sons of Peter and Martha, living in Doncaster but born in Buckley. Iball is a uniquely Buckley name; in 1881, every one of the 71 people with the Iball name in England, Wales and Scotland lived in Buckley. In statistical terms the number of Iball men who died was about five times greater than would be predicted based on population. Albert Iball of Langold, Nottinghamshire and William Harold Iball of Abergavenny were killed in WW2.


Learn more about the other soldiers on the Buckley Memorial

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