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Davies, Charles

This is an amended version of Charles’s family history and now I know that there were 3 brothers and 1 cousin who sadly died in the Great War.

Charles is a Brother to Hedley & Frank DAVIES, who also died in WW1 and their family paid a heavy price.  Hedley and Charles are remembered on the Hawarden Memorial, but Frank is remembered on the Gwersyllt War Memorial as he was living there with his wife and family and is buried in Gwersyllt Churchyard.   Edward John Wainwright is his cousin, he is mentioned further in the story.

Charles, age 9, is on the 1901 census as the brother-in-law of Thomas Wainwright, they were living in Ewloe, Hawarden (Flint),Cheshire.  (Hawarden was often shown as Flintshire and Cheshire at this time.

The Wainwright family itself consisted of Head of the household, Thomas, 28 and a Coal Miner (Hewer), all the family had been born in Hawarden.  His wife Elizabeth age 26, their son Edward J. age 5, daughter Mary R., 4 and daughter Eugenia 2.  Also there was Elizabeth’s father John Davies, a widower, who was 58 and described as Thomas’s Father-in-law and a Gardener.

I believe that Charles was the brother of Thomas’s wife Elizabeth Wainwright (nee Davies).  Charles was the son of John & Mary Davies, Ewloe, and his birth registered in Hawarden (HAW/38/55) in 1892.   His Baptism was on the 24th March 1892, but he was born on the 26th December 1891, when his birth would not have been able to be registered in the same year probably.   Please see the baptism on the website.

Sadly Charles was to lose his mother Mary when she died in February 1895, when he was no more than 3 and a half years old.    Mary was buried at Hawarden on the 11th February 1895, please see the Burial on the website.   This is probably why John Davies and Charles were living with Elizabeth, but then John went to live with his son Frank and his wife Edith in Gwersyllt, as they are seen on the 1911 census, so now confirming that John Davies was his father and was living in Wrexham when the Commonwealth War Graves Commission information was given, probably around 1921 and the reason that Thomas Wainwright signed the Flintshire Index card.

I believe that Elizabeth married Thomas Wainwright in 1895, in the same year her mother Mary died, in a Civil ceremony in Chester. (Cheshire West, Cheshire, ROC/33/105).   This would have to be purchased to confirm/deny.

Charles was to suffer the death of his sister Elizabeth in 1908 (HAW/04A/35). Please see Burial on the Website.     Thomas Wainwright remarried about 1 year later, but probably he had to have someone to look after the children, it was often done in those days to keep the family from the workhouse.

Thomas Wainwright married Mary E. Wyatt in a civil ceremony in 1909 in Hawarden, (HAW/03/27) and Charles was to continue living in the household of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth as they are shown living in Chapel Row, Ewloe, near Chester in 4 Rooms.  However Mary Elizabeth was listed at the end of the names on the census form in 1911, and Charles was named just above her.   Thomas filled in the census form.  Thomas was now 38 and still in the coal mines as a hewer, he stated that he had 4 children born alive and they were still living.  Daughter Mary Eliza was 14 and a domestic general servant, son Edward. John* was 15 and an Iron Worker, Scrap Boy, son Thos. Albert was 7, Charles Davies, brother-in-law was single, now 19 and a coal miner (Haulage), Thomas’s wife Mary Eliz. Wainwright was 34 and “second wife”, married 2 years.

* Edward John Wainwright also lost his life in the Great War, please click on the link to reads his story.

On Charles’s Flintshire WW1 Index Card his address was given as Chapel Row and the card was signed by Thomas Wainwright on the 16th October 1919 the same day he signed his son Edward John’s card, so I really believe that Thomas loved Charles as his own son.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919 accessible on www.ancestry.co.uk  confirms the regimental details above and tells us that Charles resided in Ewloe Green and enlisted in Buckley.

Charles’s Medal card also on ‘ancestry’ details his medals and adds that his first Theatre of War was France and he entered it on 2nd December 1915.

Charles is remembered on the family gravestone

Monumental Inscription of the Wainwright Grave.

In Loving Memory of Elizabeth,

beloved wife of Thomas Wainwright of Ewloe

who died January 30th 1908 aged 33 years. 

“Safe in the arms of Jesus”.  

Also Pte. E.J. Wainwright 10th Batt. R.W.F.

son of the above, who died of wounds

Feb 5th 1917 aged 21 years.  

Also Pte. C. Davies 14th Batt R.W.F.

Killed in France May 6th 1916 aged 24 years.*

*Charles is also remembered on the Imperial War Museum – Memorial Project – http://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/60257 – Description – Addition to gravestone.
Inscription
(…)/ ALSO PTE C. DAVIES 14TH BATT. R.W.F./ KILLED IN FRANCE MAY 6TH 1916,/ AGED 24 YEARS./ WE HAVE FOUGHT A GOOD FIGHT.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919 about Charles Davies confirms the above and tells us he resided at Ewloe Green and enlisted in Buckley.

Charles’s Medal card tells us that his first Theatre of War was France and he entered it on 2nd December 1915, he died nearly 6 months later.

On the Commonwealth War Graves Commission database, in the additional Information, Charles is said to be the son of Mr. J. Davies, of 33,Moss Hill, Moss, Wrexham.  I do not know why Charles stayed and lived with Thomas and his family after the death of his sister Elizabeth, I can only presume that Elizabeth had been like a mother to him, but he was obviously loved as he was included in the wording of the gravestone.  The other query, if there is one, is the fact that the Commonwealth War Graves and the Flintshire Index card does not agree with Charles’s Regimental number, on the CWGC and all other Army documentation he is given the No., 20796, the Flintshire Index Card shows his number as 20789, written and signed by Thomas Wainwright. Looking on Find my Past, there is no Charles or C. Davies, with the Regimental Number 20789, so I presume it was a clerical error on the part of Mr. Wainwright, which is so easily done.

 

 


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