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Clark, Thomas Pierce

omas (Tom) Pierce Clark was born in Flint in March or April of 1899 and was the youngest of three children to James Clark and Elizabeth (Pierce) of 15, Halkyn Street, Flint.

Tom was educated at Holywell County School, never married and his occupation is unknown.

He enlisted at Wrexham in January 1917 and had previously served with the Territorial Reserve Battalion, No. 40483.

He was killed in action in Belgium on 16th April, 1918.

Early in May 1918 much anxiety was experienced concerning the absence of information as to the whereabouts of Private Clark. He was home on leave about Easter, and left shortly afterwards for the Front. A letter written on 19th April by a personal friend was received by Mr and Mrs Clark enquiring whether they had any official information as to their son, as the last he saw of him was lying on the ground, having been wounded. The writer stated that he was unable to render his comrade any assistance, but informed the stretcher-bearers of the locality where Clark was left. He had since made several enquiries but had failed to ascertain anything as to his whereabouts. Mr Clark paid a visit to the Records’ Office at Shrewsbury but nothing could be gained; and since then a communication had been forwarded to the Commanding Officer of the Battalion, and consequently a reply was being awaited. Nearly one month had then elapsed since Private Clark had written home; and the hope was expressed that he had been removed for medical treatment, probably as a prisoner of war in the hands of the Germans. Information was subsequently received from a comrade that he had died after only two days in the line. In his last letter home, dated 31st March, 1918, he wrote:

“Do not worry, mother dear, remember I go out for a good cause, and you can rest assured your son will not fail in his duty to his King and Country and the dear folk at home. I have put all my trust in God, and I feel quite safe. Au revoir.”

He has no known grave but is remembered on the Tyne Cot, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium, on Panels 65 to 66.

He is remembered on three memorials – Flint Town, St. Mary’s Parish Church, Flint and Holywell County School (now in Holywell High School). He is also remembered on the North Wales Heroes’ memorial Arch, Bangor and his parent’s headstone in the Northop Road Cemetery, Flint, on Grave 9, Line 6, West Side.

He was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

His father died 28th April 1929, aged 63, at his home, “Mohrcroft”, Halkyn Road, Flint, after a long illness, and buried in the Northop Road Cemetery, Flint. He was born at Gateshead-on-Tyne, but had lived at Flint practically all his life and was well known and highly respected. He had been employed by the United Alkali Company for forty-four years as book-keeper but in his later years was in the service of the Chester, Wrexham and District Savings Bank at their Flint Branch in Holywell Road. He was a faithful member of the English Wesleyan Church, Holywell Road, of which he was a trustee. He was also a member of the Tower of Refuge Tent of the I.O.R., and was one of the pioneer workers in connection with the Juvenile Tent at Flint. He acted as their auditor and at one time held the office of Chief Ruler of the Chester District. For a short period he was a member of the Flint Town Council, being elected unopposed at a bye-election, but when his term of office expired he did not seek re-election.

His mother died 29th November 1956, aged 88, and buried with her husband and daughter Adelaide.

Northop Road Cemetery, Flint

 

IN MEMORIUM

In sad but loving Birthday remembrance of our dear boy.
I sigh all times to see thy face,
But since this cannot be,
I’ll leave thee to the care of Him
Who cares for thee and me;
“I’ll keep you both beneath my wings,”
This comforts, dear,
One wing’s o’er thee, and one o’er me,
So are we near,
He holds thy hand, he claspeth mine,
And keeps us near.

‘Tis a weary wait, but have never given up hope.
His grieved Parents, Brother and Sister.
15, Halkyn Street, Flint.
(County Herald 4th April 1919)

Rest well dear son, for at the great awakening,
When Christ shall call His soldiers to His side,
His promise stands, there shall be no forsaking,
Of those who fought for Him, and fighting died.
Sadly missed by all at home.
15, Halkyn Street, Flint.
(County Herald 19th December 1919)

In sad but ever loving 21st birthday remembrance of our dear nephew.
Gone to rest through pathway of duty,
Venturing his life that others may live,
One of the best that God ever lent,
A beautiful life so nobly spent.

His voice still sounds in memory’s ear,
Like distant music once so clear,
In fond remembrance yet he smiles,
Though from our sight he is lost awhile.

He loved not war, but at his country’s call
He made the great surrender, leaving all;
Friends, plans, ambitions, all the hope of years,
He laid upon the altar – with our tears.
Sadly missed by his loving Uncle and Aunt, Leslie and Margery.
Bodoryn Road, Abergele.
(County Herald 2nd April 1920)

In very sad but ever loving 21st birthday remembrance of our dear son.
He willingly gave his life that others may live,
Lying wounded, my boy, how your thoughts must have flown,
To your father and mother, and the loved ones at home,
What would I give to have only been there,
To soothe your last moments with mother’s care.

Days of darkness still come o’er me,
Sorrow’s path I often tread,
But the Saviour still is with me,
By His hand I am safely led;
He will keep me till the river
Rolls the waters at my feet,
Then He’ll bear me safely over
Where my dear boy I shall meet.

Two years have passed, how long it seems,
In all our thoughts his face still beams,
And so we sadly yearn
For the old time step and the dear old smile,
We cannot say, and do not say
That he is dead, he’s just away.
Mother’s lifelong sorrow.
Sadly missed by Father, Mother, Brother, Sister, Mamie and Annie.
15, Halkyn Street, Flint.
(County Herald 9th April 1920)

In very sad but ever loving 22nd Birthday remembrance of our dear son.
What would I give his hand to clasp,
His dear sweet face to see,
His loving smile and cheery words,
Which meant so much to me.
We doubt not that for one so true
God will have other nobler work to do.
Surely for him, whose earth’s last fight is fought,
God did not give that martial soul to end at last at naught ,
That steadfast soldier’s heart was not for this brief life alone,
‘Tis as a soldier he will stand before the Great White Throne.
Mother’s lifelong sorrow.
So sadly missed by Father, Mother, Brother, Sister, Grandmother and Aunt.
15, Halkyn Street, Flint.
(County Herald 1st April 1921)

In very sad but ever loving 22nd Birthday remembrance of our dear nephew.
He loved not war, but at his country’s call
He made the great surrender, leaving all;
Friends, plans, ambitions, all the hope of years,
He laid upon the altar – with our tears.
Sadly missed by Uncle, Aunt, Leslie and Madge.
Bodoryn Bach, Abergele.
(County Herald 1st April 1921)

In sad but ever lasting remembrance of my loved ones. My dear Addie; my dear son; also my dear husband, James Clark (our dad).
Oft are the days of sadness,
When my eyes are dim with tears,
I can hear their sweet voices calling
Hush Mum, we’ll meet again on the Golden Shore.
Your lonely and sorrowing mother, “Caroola,” Prestatyn, and Frank (Widnes).
(County Herald 3rd April 1936)


Learn more about the other soldiers on the Flint Memorial

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